Wine Stemware Purchasing Guide


Things you should consider when buying bulk wine stemware at wholesale prices.


By Kinnek Community  |  March 11, 2016

Before you make a purchase, let Kinnek do the hard part. Submit a free request for quotes using the form to the right, and we'll get multiple suppliers to provide you their wine stemware offerings and pricing. This way, you can compare all your options in one place!

Wine glasses are essential for restaurants and bars. Many different styles and sizes are available in bulk from our suppliers. Our suppliers can handle as little as 72 glasses per order, but it is often more economical to condense your wine glass order into as few shipments as possible to save on freight costs, which can be significant.

Customization is important to make your wine glasses stand out, and the suppliers on Kinnek can decorate your order with an imprinted logo or design. There is typically a set-up charge for imprints, but some distributors will waive the fee if you order at least 12 cases (144 glasses).

 

Blank wine glasses

Blank wine glasses

Wine goblet

Customized wine goblet

Wine flute

Imprinted wine flute


Most importantly, however, your choice of wine stemware will affect the aroma, complexity of flavor, strength of flavor, and harshness of the wine.  The type of wine glass you choose – the shape, material, and quality – is highly significant in influencing the experience of the wine itself.  Therefore, before you bulk purchase stemware, consider the selection of wine that you will be serving at your restaurant.  If pinot noir is far more popular at your restaurant than zinfandel, for example, then you may want to purchase a greater quantity of burgundy glasses to accommodate this demand.
 
Good luck!
 
Basic Wine Glass Shapes
 
Burgundy
Burgundy wine glasses have a wide bowl that narrows in the center, then opens into a wide lip.  They are commonly used to serve pinot noir and other light, delicate reds.  The shape of a Burgundy glass allows for the aroma of the wine to accumulate in the bowl, then expand, enhancing it, and the wide lip of the glass directs the wine to the tip of the drinker’s tongue, prioritizing the sweetness of the wine.
 
Bordeaux
Bordeaux glasses are commonly used to serve full-bodied reds, such as Shiraz, Merlot, or Cabernet Sauvignon.  Bordeaux glasses are tall, and like Burgundy glasses, they have a wide bowl (though not as broad as an equivalent Burgundy).  The wide bowl of a Burgundy glass works to oxygenate mature reds, as well as to enhance the aroma through accumulation in the bowl.  The height of the glass directs the wine towards the center and back of the tongue for a fuller texture.
 
Fluted Glass
Tall, narrow, fluted glasses are use to serve champagne and sometimes very light white wines.  The small mouth of the glass lowers the possibility of oxidation (which can negatively affect the flavor of a lighter wine) and, for champagne, allows for the accumulation of the carbon dioxide fizz at the top of the glass, giving the desired ‘tingle’ feeling to the nose of the drink.
 
Coupe Glass
Wide, shallow coupe glasses are used to serve champagne (and sometimes, mixed drinks).  Coupe glasses have fallen out of favor for champagne in recent decades, though they remain somewhat popular at wedding receptions and other large events.  Though Coupe glasses are, by most accounts, very aesthetically pleasing, the shape of the glass results in rapid loss of champagne carbonation, a weakness that Fluted glasses do not suffer from.  The wide mouth of a Coupe may also create an unwanted ‘oxidized’ flavor, though as a benefit, the mouth will direct the wine to the tip of the tongue, enhancing any existing sweetness profile.
 
Tulip
Tulip glasses are popular for both champagnes and standard white wines.   Tulip glasses resemble both Bordeaux and Fluted glasses.  The bowl of the Tulip is broader than the mouth, which narrows, though not as sharply as a Fluted glass.  This reduces the tendency for oxidation, which is a positive for lighter white wines that need to preserve their ‘crisp’ flavor.  For full-bodied white wines, a shorter glass with a broader bowl and wider mouth are recommended, so that the wine can be sufficiently oxidized (to aerate the wine and bring out its full flavor and aroma profile).  
 
Stemmed vs. Unstemmed
 
Unstemmed wine glasses have become very popular in recent years, and can be used to give off a more casual aesthetic at your restaurant or bar.  The main issue with unstemmed wine glasses is that there is direct contact between the body and the glass bowl, so body heat easily transfers to the wine.  For white wines, which are generally served cool, unstemmed glasses are a big no-no.  For red wines, however – and specifically fuller bodied, more mature red wines such as Pinot Noir – the heat transfer that results from use of an unstemmed wine glass may not be an issue.
 

Get Quotes right away

Get free Wine Glass Quotes from Multiple Suppliers

Get Quotes
Related Articles

The Three Items of Merchandising You Need to Promote Your Brewery

For many craft breweries, promoting their business is a hot-topic. We show you three easy ways to promote your brewery using merchandising as a cost-effective, quick method to get the word out.

Nora D. McGunnigle

Profile: California Winemaking at Cinnabar Winery

Profile of Cinnabar Winery & head winemaker George Troquato, who regards California winemaking as an enchanting form of modern-day alchemy.

Madina Papadopoulos

Commercial Measuring Equipment Purchasing Guide

Kinnek Community

Used Restaurant Equipment Purchasing Tips

Everything you need for your used restaurant purchases.

Kinnek Community