0

For beer filling on a commercial scale, is it highly recommended to use a double pre-evacuation filling setup? Are there major downsides to not using double pre-evac?


14 views

Add comment
Comment



2 answers

0

David Falkenstein from Cadejo Brewing Company

You absolutely want to reduce air in the bottle before filling. Double pre-evac is one of the best ways of achieving this but a single pre-evac combined with a long tube filler will achieve comparable low airs to double pre-evac with short tubes.  Yes there is a major downside to not evacuating air, it is called oxidation.  The flavor of your beer will spoil very rapidly if you fill without evacuation. To give you an idea....we fill some growlers at the tap without any air reduction, the beer will stay fresh from 3 days to a week max. We also fill some growlers using a beer gun which flushes the bottle with CO2 before filling....we probably reduce the air in the bottle by 50% or more and this increases the beer's useful life to 3 to 4 weeks.  With double pre-evac you achieve a 99% air reduction which should allow your beer to live for 6 months or more.  Pasteurization doesn't have anything to do with this discussion, that is process used to reduce microbiological load in your beer to keep it from spoiling.  If you have a good brewing process and good quality control you can bottle beer withouth pasteurizing it...and keeping it cold is always best.  

Jul 5, 2014

Add comment
Comment



1 answer


0

John Watt from Stout Tanks and Kettles

With tunnel pasteurization, you are pasteurizing the beer after it is in the package, so not only the beer but the package is pasteurized.  With flash pasteurization, there is risk that the beer will become contaminated downstream of the flash pasteurizer.  

However, with flash pasteurization you don't have to worry about the airs in the package causing oxidation during pasteurizing, which can happen with tunnel pasteurization.

Oct 29, 2013

Add comment
Comment


Kinnek Supplier

10 answers