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When filling kegs from the brite tank, what pressure should the keg be?

Should there be foam?
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4 answers

30

As a general rule, always try to keep your keg psi lower than your brite tank psi.  You do not want CO2 to leak back into the brite tank (in the form of foam), as this could potentially contaminate the beer in the brite tank.  Keep the psi in the keg lower, let the  beer transfer through the hose from the brite tank to the keg, and then once the pressure reaches equilibrium, bleed the gas vent a bit to allow any foam to settle in the keg.
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1

When filling a keg, you are filling based on two principles - gravity and pressure.

Gravity, because you keg is below the beer level in the brite tank.
Pressure, because your keg is unpressurized and the brite tank is. 

* If you fill a keg that has less internal pressure than the tank, it will fill really fast and create foam.
* If you fill a keg that is the same pressure as the brite, you will still fill the keg, just very slowly, as you will only be using gravity to pull the beer into the keg. You will, however, have no foam.
* The ideal situation is right in between these two scenarios. You want to have some pressure in the keg as you are filling, but bleed it off slowly so you never match the internal pressure of the brite tank.
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1

These other responses are correct, you want the psi lower than the brite tank.

Most of our 300 plus breweries use a psi of between 3 psi and 16 psi., unless you are a cidery; then the psi is generally higher (16-29 psi)
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1

always try to keep your keg psi lower than your brite tank psi
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