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When purchasing my next wine press, do I need to consider how I separate out the free-run juice and the pressed juice?

Do some presses make that separation easier? Is it even worth worrying about?


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Kinnek Knowledge Team

The separation of free-run juice and press-juice should not be a major consideration when purchasing your next wine press.  Most modern wineries separate the free-run juice early in the production process, usually after crushing/destemming.  As such, the wine press will not be used for separating free-run juice and press-juice.  

Of course, during the pressing process itself there is going to be some excess juice runoff.  If you are concerned, perforated 'open' wine presses more effectively expel juice runoff relative to non-perforated 'closed' wine presses.  

Apr 1, 2014

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Joe Lutomske from ENOTOOLS

     The type of press (open vs. closed style press vs. basket press) has no bearing on this. Free run juice should be captured by the harvest bins, receiving hopper, and the container in which the grapes land after the destemmer. It should never escape the process. Anything you didn't press out of the grapes in the press is free run. 
     Free run juice will actually make it all the way to the press and will flow out of the press before you apply pressure and during initial rotations or ramp- up to initial pressure. A closed press theoretically prevents oxidation of the juice on it's way to the pan or fermentor. A closed press will not entrap the free run juice. 
     Press cuts can be made at any time, on any scale, with any type of press.  

Apr 14, 2016

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